Compound Words: Learn to Read (Book)

Two or more words of entirely different meanings join together to form a new meaningful word. We label these words as Compound Words i.e. derived from the joining of singular words. Therefore, compound words are those that function as a singular unit expressing a separate idea from the combining words they generated from.

There are 3 types of compound words in general

  1. Open compounds: In these compounds, words are spelled together just separated by a space, expressing the single meaning derived from the use of these two words used together.
  2. Closed compounds: A closed compound word usually combines two words to form a single big word that manifests a different meaning to the combined words that may or may not be related to the words merged for the development of this new meaningful word.
  3. Hyphenated compound words: The practice of integrating words separated by a hyphen is commonly observed nowadays. A sequence of words followed one after the another to confer specific meaning to the given line of words. The point to be noted as language evolves and the use of two terms consequently takes place one after the another, the word gain acceptance and becomes a closed compound word for general use by masses.

To construct or reinforce the ability to identify, determine and manipulate the parts of a compound word (creating and deleting) for easy usage to becoming familiar with their meaning while writing or reading for easy comprehension purposes is the goal behind the groundwork we are going to carry out in the attached sheets.

While reading a book to be able to differentiate and recognize a compound word from the rest is a kindergarten auditory awareness development skill that lends help in understanding word formations to getting spellings correct.

Compound words are baby steps that lay the foundations for building a rich vocabulary. The deeper you delve into word-formation, practice often, the easier it becomes for you to learn, understand and consolidate new words as you encounter them. The best practice is breaking and uniting words to be able to read and write fluently.

This workbook solely focuses on closed compound words in which naming pictures and teaching kids by combining illustrations is commonly practiced.

Hint: Compound words can be easily broken apart into two separate distinguished meaningful words from which they were originally formed.

Compound Words

Compound Words: Learn to Read
Download the Book- Compound Words Learn to Read

FootBall

Two words Foot and Ball having entirely different meanings consolidate together to form FootBall – a ball that is always kicked by the foot.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Wheel Chair

 Wheel and Chair having entirely different meanings consolidate together to form WheelChair – a chair with wheels that confers mobility to a person who sits on it.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Lady Bird

Two words Lady and Bird with completely different meanings join together to form LadyBird –  a beetle with hidden wings.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Tea Pot

Two words Tea and Pot with entirely different meanings consolidate together to form TeaPot – a vessel for making and serving tea.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Cup Cake

Cup and Cake get fused to form CupCake – a small cake baked in a small aluminum cup designed to serve a person.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Earrings

Two words Ear and Rings with entirely different meanings consolidate together to form Earrings – jewelry that is worn in or adorned anywhere on the ear.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Sunflower

Sun and Flower with entirely different meanings consolidate together to form Sunflower – a flower that looks like the sun.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Basket Ball

Two words Basket and Ball are fused to form Basketball – A ball used in a team sport to shoot or throw a ball in a defender’s basket hoop to score points.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Door Bell

Door and Bell come together to form Doorbell – a bell placed near the door outside one’s house which you have to ring to enter inside.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Day Dream

Two words Day and Dream having entirely different meanings consolidate together to form Daydream – to think pleasantly and or imagine scenarios in mind while you are awake.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

See Saw

See and Saw, both words with entirely different meanings come together to form Seesaw – a long narrow board supported at the midpoint found in the playground on which repeated motions are observed. One person falls while the other emerges or rises oscillating in mid-air facing each other – observing each other moving back and forth to carefully adjust the speed of the swing according to their suitability.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Handbag

Two words Hand and Bag with different meanings join together to form a Handbag – a small bag better known as a purse used by women to carry daily essentials which often features an attached long strap or handle that one can rest on their shoulders or use for getting a good grip on your bag when held by one hand.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Pancake

Two words Pan and Cake with entirely different meanings consolidate together to form a Pancake – a round cake cooked on a hot frying pan.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Spaceship

Words Space and Ship with different meanings come together to form a Spaceship – a vehicle or spacecraft designed for operation in space and controlled by the crew of the ship in similar grading lines as those on a  ship in the middle of an ocean.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

 

Goldfish

Two words Gold and Fish with entirely different meanings consolidate together to form a Goldfish – a golden-colored fish, a symbol of good luck and fortune.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Mailbox

If two words Mail and Box with entirely different meanings come together, they form a Mailbox – a public box with a slot into which mail is placed or delivered for collection by the post office.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

 

Bookshelf

Book cum Shelf, when these two words with different meanings fuse, Bookshelf is formed- a shelf on which books can be kept, arranged, and stored.

Compound Words: Learn to Read

Starfish

Two entirely different words Star and Fish come together to form Starfish – a Star-shaped fish present inside deep-sea waters.

Watermelon

Two words Water and Melon having entirely different meanings consolidate together to form Watermelon – a tasty, thirst-quenching fruit enjoyed in the heat of summer.

Popcorn

Two words Pop and Corn having entirely different meanings consolidate together to form PopCorn – a snack made out of corn kernel that pops, expands, and puffs up when heated.

Rainbow

Two words Rain and Bow having entirely different meanings from each other get combined to constitute Rainbow- a multicolored arc made by light striking rain droplets

Raincoat

If two words Rain and Coat with entirely different meanings are fused they make up a Raincoat- A long, light, and waterproof or you may say a water-resistant coat that keeps you dry in rain.

Butterfly

Two words Butter and Fly having entirely different meanings from each other consolidate together to form – Butterfly is a brightly colored insect with conspicuous, fluttery wings.

Cowboy

If two words Cow and Boy with completely different meanings are joined together it becomes a Cowboy A boy whose job is to take care of cattle.

Lipstick

Two words Lip and Stick having entirely different meanings from each other consolidate together to form – Lipstick are brightly colored insects with conspicuous, fluttery wings.

Armchair

If two words Arm and Chair having completely different meanings are joined together- an Armchair is formed, which is a large, comfortable chair with added side supports for a person’s arms.

Dragonfly

Two words Dragon and Fly having different meanings come together to form – Dragonfly, which is a predatory flying insect also known as devil’s fly.  The word Devil = Drac = Dragon and dragonfly which are usually present in a variety of colors.

Earthquake

Two words Earth and Quake with completely different meanings join together to form the word

Earthquake- The movement of the earth’s crust or volcanic activity is caused by a sudden strong shaking of the ground.

Moonlight

If two words Moon and Light with entirely different meanings are combined, we get

Moonlight- The light of the moon or the rays of light that emit from the moon.

Eyeball

Two words Eye and Ball with entirely different meanings join together to form an

Eyeball – the round part or ball of the eye through which we see.

Stopwatch

Two words Stop and Watch with entirely different meanings consolidate together to form a

Stopwatch– A watch with a hand or a digital display that can be stopped or started at will for measuring brief time intervals.

Houseboat

Two words – Boat and House having entirely separate meanings from each other are combined to form a Houseboat – a boat that people use as a home and for sailing purposes as well.

Sunshine

If words Sun and Shine having entirely different meanings are used together, they form

Sunshine – warmth, and light provided by the sun’s rays when it rises and shines above the horizon.

Cheesecake

Two words Cheese and Cake with entirely different meanings fuse to form a

Cheesecake – a dessert cake made of cheese.

Shoebox

If the words Shoe and Box having entirely different meanings are combined, they give rise to the word Shoebox – a box in which a pair of shoes are kept, delivered or sold.

 

These worksheets will prove to be effective and save your time only when you read, visualize and practice daily.

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